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Construction & Technical
One nice perk of this boat scribe game is that manufacturers are often willing to loan you kit to test on your boat. Sometimes you aren't really interested in the gear, but agree to test it anyway just to be polite. Other times you are dying to get your hands on it, as you are...
Having blasted the bejesus out of the nether regions of poor Lunacy’s hull (see our last episode), I next needed to decide what anti-fouling paint to dress her up in to make her respectable again. In the Good Old Days we never worried about such things. When I was a boy, so much poison was...
Soon after I purchased Lunacy and brought her north late in the summer of 2006 it became painfully obvious I would have to do something about her anti-fouling paint. On surveying the boat in Florida her bottom seemed reasonably fair with good paint adhesion. But soon after I hauled her out in Maine that fall...
  We've already discussed the awful proliferation of lobster pot buoys along the Maine coast. What we haven't discussed is how they interact with different sailboat hull forms. This subject suddenly seemed interesting to me (again) after I caught a buoy while sailing Lunacy twixt Chandler Cove and Portland harbor a couple of weeks ago....
  Having massaged the Insurance Gods to ensure the financing of more permanent solutions, I set out during my recent Solo Mini Cruise of Casco Bay to undo some of the damage inflicted on our poor Lunacy by the Big Bad Schooner Harvey Gamage. The ugliest bit, you may recall, was the bent forwardmost stanchion...
While Lunacy was hauled out last June to have her new engine installed, I became aware of some other problems.  The most perturbing ones concerned her rudder skeg, which is a rather high-aspect alum inum structure that is welded on to the main structure of her aluminum hull.  Problem number one was that somehow, during...
  In its own way this may have been the most important in-the-water exhibit at this year's Annapolis show.  No salesmen, ho hype---just a team of riggers changing out the standing rig on a 30-year-old Westsail 32.  What was significant was the material they were using.  No wire, no toggles, no turnbuckles.  Instead all the...
My current floating home of choice is a one-off aluminum cutter I purchased in the summer of 2006 from an active cruising couple, Bob and Carol Petterson, who commissioned the boat’s construction and launched her in 1985 .  They cruised her extensively on the U.S. East Coast and in the Bahamas and also completed a...

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